8 Replies Latest reply: May 25, 2012 3:35 PM by megademo RSS

    Parental Controls - Monitoring

    ccturnpike

      I would like to be able to monitor my child's text messaging content automatically.  As a responsible parent, I already check the phone for inappropriate text messages and pictures.  Unfortunately, I have found some.  Now that my child is getting a little older (and sneakier), she is deleting the worst of the worst before I get a chance to see what is going on.  So, I need a way to view a copy of all text and picture messages to and from her phone.  I am happy for her to know that I am monitoring this activity since that will help instill a sense of accountability.

       

      I understand that some other carriers provide this service.  I was told by a customer support person that Verizon has this capability (if you have a court order), but that they do not offer the service.  It seems like a feature that any responsible parent would want to have - and would even be willing to pay for.

       

      Does anyone else feel this way?  Is there any interest in such a feature?  If so, is there some way to get Verizon to listen?

        • 1. Re: Parental Controls - Monitoring
          DarkCobra

          Hello and welcome.  I'm with you 100%.   I think what you're looking for can be found below.   However, this does require the use of their phone but if you're really serious about it then this is the ultimate solution.    Verizon does not offer what you are directly asking for.   They sure outta.    I hope this helps :smileyhappy:

           

          http://www.mymobilewatchdog.com/

           


          dancingphone.gif

           

          Message Edited by DarkCobra on 06-12-2009 03:26 PM
          • 2. Re: Parental Controls - Monitoring
            gogo2323

            Due to the fact that in many cases we could be held responsible for things like child pornography, and basic criminal behaviors (possible bullying and other "invasive" messaging) that are undertaken by our children i think it only reasonable that we be allowed access to the account we pay for. I assume the court requirement has something to do with invasion of privacy, however I am unable to invade my own privacy and if the account is mine I have all rights to it, and any reasonable person would realize that I may choose to monitor at my leisure...even my children understand this.

             

            I suppose one could use the defense that their provider had the ability to assist in management of the child's activities and neglected, possibly deflecting some of the responsibility back on Verizon...however that does not help with the remainder of my child's possibly ruined life over an issue that could have been avoided.

            • 3. Re: Parental Controls - Monitoring
              eyeinthesky
              Hi Gogo I'm with you on this one. I'm a busy parent who wishes to prevent your kids from any wrong doing and involvement in bad activities. For this you need some intel and you could only accomplish it by reading what's on their mind. Kids only tell you what you want to hear, but if you have the ability to monitor their text messages any parent could prevent intelligently any path of wrong doing that your kids would eventually regret. I'm in for Verizon to give us parents the ability to accomplish this task even if offered as a separate service at a cost.
              • 4. Re: Parental Controls - Monitoring
                ImnotJesus

                So spying on your kids seems legal to you? Have you ever heard of something called the fourth Amendment, it makes illegal searches and seizures illegal. So what you would be doing would be breaking one of the laws our forefathers laid out before us. Your child can say what they want, they have a First Amendment right to do so, and if you think they may be saying something innapropriate so be it, they're only kids, I'm sure everyone in their lifetime has said something innapropriate in their lives.

                 

                {please keep it relevant}

                Message Edited by BradC on 07-29-2009 03:59 PM
                • 5. Re: Parental Controls - Monitoring
                  DaniLove13

                  ImnotJesus wrote:
                  So spying on your kids seems legal to you? Have you ever heard of something called the fourth Amendment, it makes illegal searches and seizures illegal. So what you would be doing would be breaking one of the laws our forefathers laid out before us. Your child can say what they want, they have a First Amendment right to do so, and if you think they may be saying something innapropriate so be it, they're only kids, I'm sure everyone in their lifetime has said something innapropriate in their lives.

                  I agree with you.

                   

                  [Edited: Post quoted was edited]

                   

                  Message Edited by BradC on 07-29-2009 04:00 PM
                  • 6. Re: Parental Controls - Monitoring
                    hello1234

                    safety has alot to do with it to and bringing up amendments well sorry my roof my rules trying to give some teenager there 1st and 4rth amendment rights sorry in my house IM THE PRESIDENT I really do agree that verizon should offer a service for monitoring texts and wish they would

                     

                    {please keep it relevant}

                    Message Edited by BradC on 08-14-2009 08:44 AM
                    • 7. Re: Parental Controls - Monitoring
                      ccturnpike

                      We signed up for My Mobile Watchdog.  The service does pretty much meet the need.  It did required us to get a new phone with a data plan (it does not work with all phones), plus the My Mobile Watchdog service is another $10 or so each month.  So, the total solution did get pricey.  However, since my child knows that she is being monitored, she is doing a much better job of keeping the text conversations appropriate and cutting off any off color remarks that have been directed her way.  It has also given us some opportunities to coach her in how best to handle inappropriate remarks -- something that she was too inexperienced to handle and too embarrassed to ask us about.

                       

                      As for those who are citing constitutional excuses for not being a good parent... If your child decides to cross a street and you see a truck coming that will surely hit them if they don't stop, are you invading their privacy by reaching out and pulling them out of harm's way?  Or, should you respect their decision making abilty and their privacy and let them be killed or injured by the oncoming vehicle that they did not see coming?  If your child invited a child molester into your home, do you think it might be OK to insist that this person not spend the night there?  If you have trouble with these questions, stop reading now.  You need help.

                       

                      It is no different when a sexual pervert enters my child's life via an electronic device that I own and provide for her use.  I am still responsible for her safety, just as I am responsible for her safety on the street and in my home.  When she becomes an adult, I will withdraw my protection except when she requests it, but while she is a child, I must do my best to protect her.

                      • 8. Re: Parental Controls - Monitoring
                        megademo

                        Um, so "yes", spying on your kids IS legal, ImnotJesus. Strange thing about the constitution. There's this organization called the "Supreme Court" that continually refines and interprets what the founding fathers meant and intended. As the Supreme Court sees it, parents have rights and obligations too. These rights trump your morale reprehension of "spying". Don't want to? Don't. Think it's necessary? Then do. The tools are out there and there's no legal issue with it (hence the reason why they're on the market). Now, Verizon -- where's the tool from you?

                         

                        Background information:

                        In the early 1920s, the United States Supreme Court first reviewed the rights, liberties and obligations of parents to direct the upbringing of their children. Two important decisions, Meyer v. Nebraska and Pierce v. Society of Sisters, established a legacy which was followed by a series of decisions holding that parenting is a fundamental constitutional right, and among "the basic civil rights of man."

                         

                        Choices about marriage, family life, and the upbringing of children are among those rights the Court has ranked as "of basic importance in our society," and as sheltered by the 14th Amendment, cannot be usurped.

                         

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                        Message was edited by: Verizon Moderator