Mystery of Samsung Galaxy Nexus

popo123
Member

I own a Samsung Galaxy Nexus.  I am disappointed and perplexed about all of the controversy involving promises to provide official updates OTA. One account informs me Google is responsible for implementing the procedure.  I obtained an app from the Android Market which supposedly had the ability to provide some answers.  This device advised me that Google is responsible for providing the OTA updates, but Verizon has to approve such action.

Customers who purchased this phone did so with the expectation that it was an elite product capable of providing impeccable service.  I have not read of instances involving the necessity to update expensive cars, boats or airplanes.

If problems exist, treat your customers as you would want to be treated.  We have an IQ above room temperature and can understand when we are being sent down roads which travel around the issue, but provide no plausible solution.

Re: Mystery of Samsung Galaxy Nexus

demmo86rt
Leader

Not sure the point you are trying to make here, but it seems some explanation is in order.  Most Android phones have a fairly complicated update procedure, causing updates to be delayed for what can seem like an unreasonably long amount of time.  The Android OS is developed by Google, with all OS revisions uploaded here: http://source.android.com/ Here you will find the source code for all Android builds (except for 3.0 Honeycomb, the tablet OS that they didn't want somebody shoehorning into a phone), hence the label of "open source".  This source code is then taken by the OEMs, tailored to work with their phones, skinned, tweaked, and modified to their liking.  The source for these modified versions of Android is then uploaded to the OEMs' servers for all to enjoy (except for any proprietary pieces, again, part of being open source).  The tricky part is what comes next.  The OEM version is then handed off to Verizon (along with the phone if it is a new one) for testing and then sent back with what I am sure is a list as long as your arm of stuff that Verizon wants changed, as well as stuff that may have not passed their testing.  The future upgrade then bounces back and forth for a while, getting modified until it is to Verizon's and the OEM's satisfaction, and then sent to your phone via OTA upgrade.  Bugfix releases are a little less complicated as they only involve parts of the code that are being looked at, but can still take a while, just like any troubleshooting process. 

Nexus phones, on the other hand, are updated by Google, making for much faster updates without all the back and forth between OEM's and Verizon.  Of course, some testing is needed to make sure that the fix put into place does not break some other feature of the phone.  This also means that if Google feels that the source needs some tweaking, decides to add a small feature, or comes out with a new OS version (Jelly Bean), the GNex will be the first device to get it, aside from the next Nexus device.  Many OEMs don't bother will some of the incremental updates and just stick to whatever they were working on, and some devices never see a full version upgrade.  Though the trade off here is that you are basically using an experimental device.  I don't know where you got the idea that it is an "elite product capable of providing impeccable service", but that is not really the case.  It is a reference device used to show how Google intended the Android OS, and they will update it as such.

As for your vehicular example, have you never heard of a recall?  I know it's somewhat rare, but some vehicles (even expensive ones) do have to be taken in to have parts swapped out because they don't work as expected.  Smartphones, however, have the advantage of being connected and are able to have a fix pushed to them.  There may be some liberties taken, with a bit of a "fix it later attitude" toward some of the smaller stuff, but I think most of these companies know that if they are pushing faulty product out the door, they will lose business quickly.  

Again, your post was quite vague, but if you do have a real issue, I'm sure somebody here can point you in the right direction.

Re: Mystery of Samsung Galaxy Nexus

droidsw
Sr. Member

Demmo, what an excellent reply.

And to the OP, my car's software has had updates and I request they check for them and TSB's each time I take it in for service. (Yes, I use the dealer for service because I don't trust quick change establishments).

Re: Mystery of Samsung Galaxy Nexus

demmo86rt
Leader

Thank you.

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Re: Mystery of Samsung Galaxy Nexus

notarep
Novice

OP probably isn't even gonna come back after that. lol

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Re: Mystery of Samsung Galaxy Nexus

eugenetsang
Member

I cant speak on behalf of popo123.. But for myself and possibly many others out there... One of the  main selling points of the phone is, updates. Updates that google claimed will be sent over to the Nexus first. Then sent over to the other droids... But that doesnt seem to be the case.

Since my purhase, i havent gotten any OTA's. The phone is pushing 6 months old and with the trend of Androids.. I doubt the Nexus will be of any significance in the coming weeks. A new phone will be out, better and faster than the claimed, "best phone" thats out/was on the market.

I live in the North East (nyc)... I shouldnt be having issues with reception... I am not in cattle country Wyoming.....

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Re: Mystery of Samsung Galaxy Nexus

demmo86rt
Leader

Name any device that is on a higher build of Android than the GNex.  AFAIK, 4.0.3 is where the GNex should be and they are working on 4.0.4.  The Nexus line has never had the ultimate best in hardware, that's not the point of Nexus.  The point is to have the latest firmware running on current hardware, showing the world what Android is meant to be.  You may have not received any OTAs, but that does not mean that it is not up to date, it just means they haven't released anything new since you bought it.  The reception issues may not be a software issue, Samsung phones are somewhat known for sub-par antennas.  Future OTAs may contain updated radios, but if the hardware is lacking, there is only so much that can be done.

Re: Mystery of Samsung Galaxy Nexus

Ann154
Expert

I purchased my Nexus for the direct updates from Google, but more importantly for the lack of bloatware. I am not upset that there hasn't been a system update since earlier this year. I am speaking of the update from 4.0.1 to 4.0.2 in January.

I am quite pleased that I was able to disable the application that I never intend to use.

As for signal, I generally have good signal and connection speeds. There are some weak spots, but I had those same weak spots with a HTC Thunderbolt. I had to get a new SIM card with the Nexus so I know that it wasn't an issue with the SIM card. It is the network in those weak spots.

I'm most definitely NOT a VZW employee. If a post answered your question, please mark it as the answer.

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Re: Mystery of Samsung Galaxy Nexus

sb4663
Member

I'm looking for a faster switch between 3g and 4g that's the only thing on my OTA wishlist...

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