Accessibility Resource Center Skip to main content
Get it fast with In-store & curbside pickup or same day delivery.

Complaints re 5 GB limit

Sirreel
Member

My complaints are three-fold: unused data is not rolled over, the usage monitor is not accurate because it is not timely, and the overage charge is punitive in that it bears little relation to the cost of actually providing the extra bandwidth.

 

My situation is an example. I typically used half of my allotment so one month I decided to try to use it all. The usage monitor was more than 24 hours behind so I couldn't tell how close I was to the limit. I ended up going over by about 140 MB, which cost $35. I signed up for service just a month before the overuse charge was reduced from $.25 to $.05, so I can safely say the overuse fee I am paying is too high by at least a factor of 5. Then consider, at $.25 per MB, the second 5 GBs of data costs $1280, while the first 5 GBs costs just $60. That is a factor of about 21.3. I'll go out on a limb and state that I don't believe it costs Verizon 21 times as much to supply me with an additional MB of data than it did the first 5120 MBs. Those overage fees don't reflect Verizon's cost, they are to punish their customers and line their pockets with easy money.

 

Now, if Verizon were to allow unused bandwidth to roll over, my problem would be solved.  Instead, Verizon keeps unused bandwidth for itself to sell to someone else. Shouldn't I get a cut of that?

 

If Verizon were to provide me with timely usage data, my problem would be solved. Instead, Verizon keeps me guessing with usage data that, at times, is more than 24 hours old. I can risk going over and paying 21 times as much for the data, or I can be conservative and back off my usage when I get to 80%. Then Verizon can sell my unused bandwidth to someone else. Shouldn't I get a cut of that?

 

If Verizon were to reduce the cost of overuse to a reasonable level, my problem would be solved. Enough said.

 

Verizon suggests they cap usage at 5 GB per month to ensure everyone gets equal access. Is that really true? Has anyone seen the data to prove that assertion? They don't really cap the usage, though, do they? All they do is make it very expensive to exceed 5 GBs. That gives their customers incentive to limit their own usage. In that way Verizon has shifted the burden of ensuring their network is not overloaded to us. If that is their scheme for keeping their network healthy, the least they could do is provide better usage monitoring so we can do their job better without overusing. (I think ensuring their network is healthy is their job.) I see that Cricket broadband throttles back the speed to their customers who go over 5 GB, but they don't charge extra. In that way Cricket takes responsibility for the health of its own network and doesn't make its customers keep an eye on the usage guage all the time, nor does it punish them monetarliy. I like that business model better and it seems a lot more honest.

0 Likes

Re: Complaints re 5 GB limit

Not applicable

The usage tracking can lag 3 or 4 days.  You should download NetMeter to keep track of your usage.  The Verizon pricing structure is designed to limit you to 5 GB.  That's why they call it a 5 GB plan. 

0 Likes

Re: Complaints re 5 GB limit

Airedale
Member

I am well aware that this is a 5 GB plan and I am careful not to go over each month. That being said I do pay each month for 5 GBs and believe that any unused time should be rolled over and accrued to the next month, it is only fair.

0 Likes

Re: Complaints re 5 GB limit

Not applicable

Fair?  Fair is if they tell you the terms in advance, then they abide by the terms.  I think they do that.  Did you read them before you bought the product?

0 Likes

Re: Complaints re 5 GB limit

nmchileman
Sr. Member

I appreciate the fact that your post is well written, has valid points and clear ideas. It's a breath of fresh air compared to the usual complaint posts. However, please allow me to retort.

 

Verizon Wireless caps your broadband usage for the same reasons other wireless carriers and ISPs do: to control usage, to protect and maintain the integrity of the network, and to provide a model that allows overage to generate a revenue stream - to make money.

 

Putting a cap on usage does help control usage, because most people who use the service won't have a problem staying within the limits. 5GB of usage is a decent amount if you use your service as a supplement to your installed internet at home or public WiFi. VZ Access Manager can help you do this with a setting that automatically connects itself to your home network or public WiFi when in range, preventing you from always connecting to mobile broadband.

 

Who's responsibility is it to protect the network? The operator of course. VZW has always put the network first. The network is everything. When you say Cricket takes more responsibility in the health of it's network, keep this in mind: Leap Wireless only has 4.3 million customers. Verizon Wireless is fast gaining on 90 million customers. Huge difference. Leap doesn't have to worry as much about bandwidth hogs putting strain on it's network. Initially VZW did offer an unlimited mobile broadband plan where they reduced your speeds if you had a habit of exceeding the 5GB limit. As the service got adopted by more and more people simply throttling the usage wasn't enough.

 

Even if every one of those 4.3 million customers used Cricket's mobile broadband service VZW would still have more people using it's netbooks, wireless cards and smartphones. All using the 3G network taking up bandwidth. So Cricket can let the few people who do have that service run amok and it won't be disastrous.

 

Consumer wise, I can see where you're coming from about having the usage roll over. I can agree with that, I guess it would be nice. On the business side. Why? VZW doesn't NEED to do that. Should they? Maybe. Maybe not. 5GB is a generous allotment for space on the 3G network. If it's used as it's supposed to be used people shouldn't have a problem staying well under the limit. Besides, they provide you with an additional option to manage your usage: free WiFi in thousands of locations across the country (mostly Starbucks) that you would normally have to pay for. It's a win-win. You get free WiFi in a lot of hotels, airports and cafe's and they get a way to offload large amounts of data from the network at little cost.

 

Get used to caps people. Home ISPs like Comcast and Time-Warner are running trials in several markets for capped/tiered pricing. I don't like it, but it's coming.

0 Likes

Re: Complaints re 5 GB limit

Sirreel
Member

Thank you for the kind words.

 

How do you know Verizon limits bandwidth to protect its network? How did they arrive at that number? Suppose that was just a an educated guess, made years ago? Suppose that number has nothing to do with protecting their network? Then, it would seem like they're doing it solely for the money, wouldn't it?  Or worse, Verizon might be putting the burden of keeping its network healthy on its customers and charging them overage fees for the privilege.

 

Remember that I pay about a penny a MB for the first 5,120 MB, then 25 cents per MB after that. Yikes. (When I signed up I thought the overage fee was a quarter cent per MB. That'll teach me to look closely at the terms and not assume anything.) Does anyone know what their actual cost is? I don't mind paying a fair price, but I don't think that is a fair price.

0 Likes

Re: Complaints re 5 GB limit

Zehan
Novice

If you're trying to get someone to agree that the entire pricing structure for wireless services is designed only to generate revenue, then you're right. The plans cost more than is necessary, overage fees are there SOLELY to cost the customer more money, and caps only serve to create those overages.

 

Congratulations, you've uncovered the purpose of Verizon Wireless: to MAKE MONEY. Now all you have to do is decide whether the service they provide is worth the cost.

0 Likes

Re: Complaints re 5 GB limit

nmchileman
Sr. Member

 


Zehan wrote:

If you're trying to get someone to agree that the entire pricing structure for wireless services is designed only to generate revenue, then you're right. The plans cost more than is necessary, overage fees are there SOLELY to cost the customer more money, and caps only serve to create those overages.

 

Congratulations, you've uncovered the purpose of Verizon Wireless: to MAKE MONEY. Now all you have to do is decide whether the service they provide is worth the cost.


 

Win.

 

0 Likes

Re: Complaints re 5 GB limit

Not applicable

Sirreel wrote:

Thank you for the kind words.

 

How do you know Verizon limits bandwidth to protect its network? How did they arrive at that number? Suppose that was just a an educated guess, made years ago? Suppose that number has nothing to do with protecting their network? Then, it would seem like they're doing it solely for the money, wouldn't it?  Or worse, Verizon might be putting the burden of keeping its network healthy on its customers and charging them overage fees for the privilege.

 

Remember that I pay about a penny a MB for the first 5,120 MB, then 25 cents per MB after that. Yikes. (When I signed up I thought the overage fee was a quarter cent per MB. That'll teach me to look closely at the terms and not assume anything.) Does anyone know what their actual cost is? I don't mind paying a fair price, but I don't think that is a fair price.


 

Where do you get the idea that what Verizon charges us needs to have anything to do with their cost?  That is not how it works.  Take a course in marketing or finance and you'll learn that pricing is based on what the market will bear and the competitive environment.

0 Likes

Re: Complaints re 5 GB limit

Deamorei
Member

"Where do you get the idea that what Verizon charges us needs to have anything to do with their cost?  That is not how it works.  Take a course in marketing or finance and you'll learn that pricing is based on what the market will bear and the competitive environment."

 

 

People have to be blind if they think that the 5GB cap on mobile broadband is focused towards roaming laptops is nothing less then highway robbery. Verizon reminds me of OPEC who use supply to manipulate pricing on a whim. There is competition in the mobile broadband market but it doesn't involve, AT&T, Sprint or Verizon who all have 5GB caps.. Mobile broadband isn't a necessity for anybody with access to hard wired with the exception of IM, texts and emails. People are not setting in there cars playing the stock markets or watching TV or streaming movies etc on a 3 hour charge using mobile broadband in great numbers. I know one in 100 people that actually uses his smart phone to web browse.We use our phones to call and text. We can check our email via webmail at any terminal if we really have to again not really a necessity for majority of internet users..

 

Instead of being a Verizon fanboi Jim do some research. Here is a good link for some info thats factual and gives us a good look at how the suppliers are really trying to hose us consumers day in and say out. http://www.stopthecap.com/ Did you know that wireless companies are trying to screw over us free DTV users as well. Read up. When Verizon realized the money they could make on us rural consumers the big CASH COW light lit up. It wont stay this way forever as the market in order to survive must diversify, and most importantly meet or exceed customer demands or the company will die a quick death.

0 Likes