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Verizon reportedly won't activate Google's Nexus 7 on its network

Virtuous
Member

The Verge posted this piece. The FCC should force Verizon to activate the Nexus 7 for LTE service.

Verizon reportedly won't activate Google's Nexus 7 on its network

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Re: Verizon reportedly won't activate Google's Nexus 7 on its network

Ann154
Expert

I wonder if you could take a previously activated SIM card for another LTE tablet and move it to the Nexus 7 and it will work. Or get a SIM card and then activate it on another device and move it to the Nexus 7.

I'm most definitely NOT a VZW employee. If a post answered your question, please mark it as the answer.

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Re: Verizon reportedly won't activate Google's Nexus 7 on its network

demmo86rt
Leader

Supposedly some have had success with this method of getting the N7 activated.  Also, Verizon says they are in the process of certifying the N7 for their LTE network.

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Re: Verizon reportedly won't activate Google's Nexus 7 on its network

Ann154
Expert

demmo86rt wrote:

Supposedly some have had success with this method of getting the N7 activated.  Also, Verizon says they are in the process of certifying the N7 for their LTE network.

I saw some news about that. I hope they don't take too long.

I'm most definitely NOT a VZW employee. If a post answered your question, please mark it as the answer.

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Re: Verizon reportedly won't activate Google's Nexus 7 on its network

wkavan02
Novice

Using a previously-activated 4G SIM card works, but trying to activate a new one in an LTE Nexus 7 fails because it is not on Verizon's device whitelist, which is a violation of the FCC's C Block rules:

(b) Use of devices and applications. Licensees offering service on spectrum subject to this section shall not deny, limit, or restrict the ability of their customers to use the devices and applications of their choice on the licensee’s C Block network, except:

(1) Insofar as such use would not be compliant with published technical standards reasonably necessary for the management or protection of the licensee’s network, or

(2) As required to comply with statute or applicable government regulation.

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Re: Verizon reportedly won't activate Google's Nexus 7 on its network

demmo86rt
Leader

The legality of this situation is debatable.  Verizon is NOT blocking the device, you just can't activate a new SIM card with it.  And, I'm sure their certification process is their way of determining (b)(1).

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Re: Verizon reportedly won't activate Google's Nexus 7 on its network

rive
Member

Yep it will work. I am doing it myself (and I also have phone capability on the Nexus 7 via Google Voice/GrooVe IP app)

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Re: Verizon reportedly won't activate Google's Nexus 7 on its network

rive
Member

Screenshot_2013-10-27-10-22-28.png

Screenshot_2013-10-27-10-22-17.png

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Re: Verizon reportedly won't activate Google's Nexus 7 on its network

Mraoul
Member

If you read the conditions in the document, they further define (b)(1) to be about interference with network operations or what not. The device should be FCC certified which means there should be a plethora of documentation that covers whether it would interfere with the network or not. This shouldn't take them longer than a week to check.

   (c) Technical standards. For purposes of paragraph (b)(1) of this

   section:

   (1) Standards shall include technical requirements reasonably necessary

   for third parties to access a licensee's network via devices or

   applications without causing objectionable interference to other

   spectrum users or jeopardizing network security. The potential for

   excessive bandwidth demand alone shall not constitute grounds for

   denying, limiting or restricting access to the network.

   (2) To the extent a licensee relies on standards established by an

   independent standards-setting body which is open to participation by

   representatives of service providers, equipment manufacturers,

   application developers, consumer organizations, and other interested

   parties, the standards will carry a presumption of reasonableness.

   (3) A licensee shall publish its technical standards, which shall be

   non-proprietary, no later than the time at which it makes such

   standards available to any preferred vendors, so that the standards are

   readily available to customers, equipment manufacturers, application

   developers, and other parties interested in using or developing

   products for use on a licensee's networks.

And the legality is not really debatable, its clearly outlined that the burden of proof is on Verizon:

(f) Burden of proof. Once a complainant sets forth a prima facie case

   that the C Block licensee has refused to attach a device or application

   in violation of the requirements adopted in this section, the licensee

   shall have the burden of proof to demonstrate that it has adopted

   reasonable network standards and reasonably applied those standards in

   the complainant's case. Where the licensee bases its network

   restrictions on industry-wide consensus standards, such restrictions

   would be presumed reasonable.

If you're a new customer (i.e., don't already have a SIM) wanting to get a Nexus 7 on to their network, they are effectively 'refusing' to attach the device.

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Re: Verizon reportedly won't activate Google's Nexus 7 on its network

9R33K933K
Member

Duplicate post - please visit:

https://community.verizonwireless.com/message/1013569#1013569

Message was edited by: Admin Moderator

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