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Setting up a LAN with a UML295 USB Modem connected to a wireless router.

Member

I have a server in my motorhome, which is running Windows Server 2008 R2, and I just purchased a USB UML295 modem, which I'm told I can plug into a router to create a mobile network.

My router is already configured with a static IP address (which is provided by my DNS service provider), and port forwarding for port 3389 (Remote Desktop Services [RDS]).  RDS is how the server will be accessed (both from the LAN and from distant locations).

How do I set up  the USB modem in order to allow the router to control the IP addresses?

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Re: Setting up a LAN with a UML295 USB Modem connected to a wireless router.

Member

Hi John,

Sorry for being so long about getting back to you on this, but when we finally got back to Georgia (we were in Syracuse, NY when I started this discussion) my wife had some serious medical issues that kept us running.

Anyhoo, here's the latest.  You were, of course, correct that the adapter allowing the USB Modem to plug into the router's WAN port doesn't work.  So I checked out those Pepwave and Cradlepoint routers and  when I saw the prices I thought they were trying to sell me the company, instead of a router.  However, I also found a brand called TP-Link which looked good, and I found one at Walmart for $40 that claimed to be compatible with "Most USB Modems", including Verizon, so I bought one.  Unfortunately after several hours of failed attempts to get it to connect, and/or update the firmware, I  was finally able to get through to them by phone, and was told that Verizon USB Modems are NOT on their compatibility list.  So now I don't know whether to sue them for false advertising <LOL>, or just take it back and get a refund (naturally that's what I'll do).

However, all is not lost; I got success out of defeat and found a way to accomplish what I wanted after all.  The Verizon USB Modem works fine when plugged directly into my server so I leave it there.  Then I set up my old Linksys router WITHOUT ANY WAN CONNECTION, just an Ethernet cable from the Server NIC to one of the router's Ethernet ports, and VOILA!, a LAN exists.  I'm able to connect to the server wirelessly using Remote Desktop Services via the LAN, and then, when I need an internet connection I simply open a browser on the server via the RDS connection.  And the best part is that I didn't have to buy anything new, since I already had the router.  It works great and the response time is almost as good as at home with my  gigabit LAN and every bit as good as when we connect to the internet via our smartphones.  I feared that there would still be a problem, however, because without a static IP address I can't connect directly to the server from out of the LAN via RDS (e.g. when we take day trips away from the motorhome and use our smart phones for hotspots).  Fortunately I found a solution for that also.  I was able to connect to the server from outside of the LAN (e.g. from my home network to the motorhome parked away from the house) by using LogMeIn.  This works well with the only limitation being that there can only one LogMeIn connection at a time.  Since it's just my wife and I, that limitation is irrelevant.

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Re: Setting up a LAN with a UML295 USB Modem connected to a wireless router.

Customer Support

Hi Creacontech - We certainly want to keep you connected while out on the open road! I apologize however we are unable to support the device when not plugged directly into a laptop. We do not have a way to by pass the dynamic IP that will always be generated by the USB device. I apologize for any inconvenience.

Thank you,

YaleK_VZW
Follow us on Twitter @VZWsupport

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Re: Setting up a LAN with a UML295 USB Modem connected to a wireless router.

Member

Thanks for your response, YaleK, and I can understand not being able to use my static IP and there are alternatives for that.  However in reading your respones I think that you've just opened a different can of worms.  Specifically, your statement, " ... we are unable to support the device when not plugged directly into a laptop", troubles me for a couple of reasons:

1)  I won't be using it in a Laptop, but in a Server.  The technician at the Verizon store in Clay, NY set that part up for me, and I was able to surf the internet.  Quite frankly I don't see what difference it makes whether the ULM295 is connected to a laptop, a tower, or, as in this case, a server.  They all have the same or similar operating system software, at least where data communications is concerned.

2)  More importantly, that technician told me that I could plug the USB Modem into a router which contains a USB WAN port, thereby creating a LAN, and then connect other computers to the router either via Ethernet or Wireless, but with the dynamic IP addresses produced by the ULM295.

Now, however, your statement tends to negate that.  My intent was to set up the LAN so that my other computers could access the server via RDS within the LAN. The static IP part which would just have been frosting on the cake.  That was only to be able to reach the server via RDS from outside the LAN (e.g. on day trips away from the motorhome, using a laptop and the mobile hotspot in my smartphone). There is an alternative for that; namely a DDNS service, which I used to have before I got the static IP.  That will work so long as your service and the ULM295 don't block port 3389 (i.e. the Remote Desktop Services listening port).

In the past, the server was set up at home and we'd connect via RDS from a laptop in the motorhome, using the smartphone's mobile hotspot.  That works ok for trips of short duration - a week at most - but we're planning to be gone next year for extended periods (3 - 6 months at a time), and if the power at home goes down - which happens with some regularity - there won't be anyone nearby to restart the server for usonce power is restored, and that's why we're taking it with us.

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Re: Setting up a LAN with a UML295 USB Modem connected to a wireless router.

Expert

Do you have any thoughts on this discussion?

I'm most definitely NOT a VZW employee. If a post answered your question, please mark it as the answer.

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Re: Setting up a LAN with a UML295 USB Modem connected to a wireless router.

Member

Ann154, I'm not sure what you're asking, or if your statement is directed to me or to YalekK.

I, however, do have another question, irrespective of my question re: static IP address.  In the Instruction sheet for the ULM295, there's a section for Business users, which mentions downloading an IPPT (Internet Pass Through) app.  What is the purpose of that software?  I will be doing some business with my server, using the ULM295 for internet access, so I need to know whether or not I should download and install the IPPT app.  I'm able to surf the internet now without having downloaded or installed it, but I'd like to know what, if any, benefits its installation would provide to me.

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Re: Setting up a LAN with a UML295 USB Modem connected to a wireless router.

Expert

No. I was mentioning another community member who is much more knowledgeable about the subject to see if they could better assist you.

I'm most definitely NOT a VZW employee. If a post answered your question, please mark it as the answer.

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Re: Setting up a LAN with a UML295 USB Modem connected to a wireless router.

Leader

Hello,

The answer to your question is going to depend on which router model you plan on using for this environment.  The configuration of your local IP Addresses will all be handled by the router, not by the USB modem.

If you are wanting to know how to configure a public IP Address for all of your local equipment so that you can access it remotely then that is a different problem (I think this is really what you are asking).  All VZW 4G LTE mobile broadband devices sit behind the VZW NAT firewall.  This NAT firewall will hand out the same IP address to all VZW users making direct remote connections impossible.  The same limitation applies to custom port forwarding.  No amount of configuration of the VZW device will allow you to forward custom ports or traffic due to the NAT firewall setup.  VZW will not make modifications to the NAT for anyone.

These are the current workarounds:

1. Configure a VPN

2. Purchase a static IP address from VZW for around $500.00

3. Switch to a different service provider that allows public IP and port forwarding

Considering the details in your post you sound fairly tech savvy so I'd imagine you can find a way to accomplish #1.  However, you also mentioned this is for your business so it may be worth it for you to consider purchasing a real static IP from VZW and avoid the extra configuration hassle associated with maintaining a VPN tunnel.

Let me know if you would like more info or advice on anything.

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Re: Setting up a LAN with a UML295 USB Modem connected to a wireless router.

Member

Hi John, and thank you for your very clear explanation.

Re your statement, "The answer to your question is going to depend on which router model you plan on using for this environment.  The configuration of your local IP Addresses will all be handled by the router, not by the USB modem."  I'll be using a Lynksys WRT54G router, which I already have set up with port 3389 forwarded and the static IP that I have at my home network (which is where I've been operating until now

After reading the rest of your response above, however, I realize I won't be able to use that static IP.  That isn't a major issue, since being able to use my existing static IP would have just been frosting on the cake, since I also use "LogMeIn", which is, after all, a VPN, which, even for business purposes, negates the need for the $500 expense.  I've already tested and found that LogMeIn will access my server from a remote laptop.  Most of our business will be conducted  from within the LAN.  It's only when we're day-tripping away from the motorhome that we'd need to access the server remotely.

What I haven't yet tested is whether I can successfully create a LAN in my motorhome by plugging the USB Modem into the WAN port of my router - I've purchased a USB (F) to RJ45 (M) adapter to make that happen - and access the server via RDS from laptops locally ON THE LAN.  The Verizon technician that sold me the USB Modem told me that it's possible to create a LAN that way, and said that people have successfully done that, so I'm hopeful that it'll work.

I do still have a question, however, to shith I'd really like to get an answer.  Specifically, What is this "IPPT" (i.e. IP Pass Through), what would it do for me and should I download and install it.  If you could give me as clear an answer to that question as you have so far, I'd be very grateful, and treat you to a great big double dip ice cream cone.

Respectfully,

Rob (removed), CDP

P.S.  BTW, thanks for the complement, and yeah I'm kind of savvy - 55 years as an IT Professional - but quite frankly, even after all those years, when I start getting into these kinds of things I feel as though I've never even seen, nor heard of a computer before, let alone work on them.  That's why my user name on Microsoft TechNet is Capt. Dinosaur.  FWIW, the first computer I worked on was the UNIVAC I, in 1960.  The CPU alone, would fill the average sized house, it took 75 tons of A/C to keep the room at 80 degrees, you had to actually walk inside of it to work on it, and it had 200 words of memory (which were drums of mercury). The mag tapes were actually steel (like a steel ruler) and it took a hand truck to move more than 3 of them.  Whenever the computer encountered a bad spot on the tape, it would halt with a zillion console lights, and we'd have to take a paper punch and punch a hole on each side of it.  Those machines rented for $10,000 a month (in 1960 dollars)  The one I worked on was a field reject that had been returned to the UNIVAC factory, and I understand it's now in the Smithsonian.  I'm told, also, that there's a glass case in back of it marked "Technician", and it's waiting for me.  ****.

>>Edited to comply with the Verizon Wireless Terms of Service<<

Edited by:  Verizon Moderator

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Re: Setting up a LAN with a UML295 USB Modem connected to a wireless router.

Leader

USB (F) to RJ45 (M) adapter:

I am not familiar with this kind of an adapter nor am I sure how it can facilitate a connection from a USB modem.  USB modems require connection software to authenticate them to the network.  This software is normally hosted on your PC or a router with connection firmware installed like those from Pepwave or CradlePoint.  If you can get this configuration to work then please post back and confirm for us.

What is IPPT:

IP Pass-Through mode, simply stated, disables the Routing and LAN functions and provides the WAN address directly to one attached network client.

Source:

http://blog.industrialnetworking.com/2012/05/enabling-ip-pass-through-on-cradle.html

In other words it is supposed to make your local devices appear to have the same IP as your modem. However, I have not seen any application that allows a USB modem or mobile broadband device to provide a true public IP address, which is really what you want.  All you are going to pass through is a private NAT IP to your local devices which will not do you any good.

If your goal is to have a USB modem provide a WAN connection directly to a router then I suggest going with a product like a Pepwave or Cradlepoint router.  These routers are specifically designed to do what you intend without the need of an adapter cable or additional connection software. You can check the spec sheets for each of the models to make sure your USB modem is supported before considering purchasing anything.

Once you have the USB Modem+Router combo configured then rely on your VPN for your public IP Address info.  If you can get your router to VPN connect then everything the router sees will be available to the VPN too.  Otherwise a locally installed VPN client on a single machine will only be able to see USB connected devices.

Hope this all makes sence, let me know if you need more clarification on anything.

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Re: Setting up a LAN with a UML295 USB Modem connected to a wireless router.

Member

Thanks for the reply, John.  I think that you've explained everything quite clearly.  The adapter that I purchased was only $8, so if it doesn't work it's no big deal, and I can probably find other uses for it at home.  Based on your explanation I don't see any value to me of the  IPPT.  Since it's mentioned in the "BUSINESS" section of the instruction booklet, I thought I should at least find out what it does and what it's for.

From what you said above, I suspect that using the adapter to plug the USB Modem into the WAN port of a "just everyday, run of the mill" router probably won't work, but I'm going to test it, since miracles do happen now and then.  With my luck, however, it probably won't; I have the kind of luck that if it was raining soup all over my county, I'd likely be in the next county with a fork.

Assuming that it doesn't work, I'll look into those router products that you mentioned.  I'm away from home right now, but will be back later this week, so I'll try the router idea then and post back with the results.  It seems to me that Verizon should know what will work, since they sell these things.  The technician that worked with me, however, didn't mention a specific router, just that he knew of people who've done that.  I'll post back as soon as I find out some further information.

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